This Group Is Dedicated To Showcasing People’s Amazing Woodworking Skills And It Doesn’t Disappoint

When it comes to home improvement, there are two kinds of people: those who buy and those who build. For people who choose to do the latter, it’s no secret that wood is their top choice of material. After all, it can literally withstand the test of time. At the same time, it blends well into any type of interior. Apparently, there’s a subreddit where talented woodworkers from all over the world gather to showcase their rad woodworking skills.

Created on August 27th, 2008, the subreddit “Woodworking” is home to nearly 2.8 million members who are passionate about the craft. It features an extensive collection of some of the most creative, unique and breathtaking wooden creations. From home décor to furniture and novelty items, there’s really no limit as to what you can build with wood. And in this post, we’ve featured 50 of the best creations that prove the members’ amazing woodworking skills. So, keep scrolling down to see more and prepare to get your mind blown!

 

“Tried my hand at woodworking and made some dining table benches.”

 

“Rocket by me.”

 

“1yr later, finally finished my first table.”

 

“I made a 600 LED programmable infinity mirror coffee table!”

 

“I made a walnut coffee bar.”

 

“My attempt at the mountain napkin holder. It’s a nice project to use up some scraps.”

 

“I made an inexpensive desk.”

 

“Boat I made in my garage. Plans are from Glen-L boat plans. This is the “squirt” 10 footer. Took me 2 years to make. I had a blast making it.”

 

Created in 2008, the subreddit “Woodworking” is an online community where talented artisans from around the world can exhibit their amazing woodworking skills

According to the community’s moderator Joseph who goes by the username joelav, the subreddit serves as “a place for woodworking Redditors to get together and exchange ideas, techniques, advice and projects.” With about 250,000 visits daily, the subreddit has become a popular source of inspiration for exceptional and unconventional woodworking projects.

 

“Dresser I made.”

 

“Finally got around to finishing my first real desk, I’m super proud.”

 

“Library I did. There are many leather-bound books, and it smells of rich mahogany.”

 

“A rare look at The Hobbit as a minimalist movie poster made from 8 different woods. I’m going on an adventure!”

 

Walnut and Oak Bunk Beds

 

“I made three colorful sharks in wood with epoxy resin, matte finish.”

 

“Who told my wife that I could make a hand-carved solid maple dresser before the baby came?!? I did it, but wow that was more work than I thought it would be.”

 

“My 14-year-old son built this coffee table for his sister and her boyfriend as a Christmas gift. It measures 28″ x 42″ and is made of red oak with red oak stain and polyurethane finish.”

Apparently, there’s one major rule that all members must abide by. That is, they can only share photos of things that they have built themselves. That way, the community’s content remains “original and organic,” as per Joseph. So, from small pieces like figurines to colossal ones like an entire staircase, every piece of work you’ll see in the group is handmade by the members.

 

“First attempts at Lego men. My lab is showing off her latest creation too.”

 

“Girlfriend wanted a ‘My Secret Wood’ ring, so 10 failed rings later, I made one just how I pictured it.”

 

From home décor and furniture to novelty items, these photos prove that there’s really no limit as to what you can build with wood

 

“End grain cutting board made from 157 pieces of black walnut, birdseye maple, and padauk.”

 

“Made a coffee table. I think the proportions are perfect.”

 

“My mom died from cancer, but before she passed she asked me to make her urn. We would jokingly refer to it as her death box. She was a strong woman.”

 

“This will go down as one of the coolest builds I’ve ever done. Wine barrel wine cellar.”

 

“My first woodworking project. A fire rack to display all of my hot sauces!”

 

“Archway a coworker and I trimmed out recently. Painted picture at the end.”

These days, it’s no secret that price has become a top consideration for most customers, especially when buying furniture. Unfortunately, this removes the emphasis on quality and craftsmanship, which probably leads many people into thinking that woodworking is now a “dying art.” But it’s clearly not. In fact, according to Scott Curry, author of the website Make from Wood, woodworking is “quite popular and growing more than ever.”

 

“Really happy with the way this Live Edge Elm table turned out as you can see on my face.”

 

“I carved a wooden Octopus who looks like he’s scared of swimming.”

 

“So I finished this chair a few days ago.”

 

“Wife wanted a Dr Seuss themed nursery so I built a Dr Seuss bookshelf.”

 

“I carved this Gandalf pipe out of briarwood.”

 

“Here is a prototype table we are making using the original Golden Gate Bridge suspender ropes and claro-walnut top. Both are over 80 years old!”

 

“A bunk bed I built for my daughter’s 5th birthday.”

 

“First try at this Japanese wizardry.”

 

There’s no doubt that the internet has made it easier for beginners and even experienced wood artists to hone their woodworking skills

For starters, the internet has made learning woodworking so much easier than ever. Aside from finding inspiration for your projects, you can also find comprehensive tutorials to help you hone your woodworking skills. And the best part? You can access most of them for free! In terms of customer base, sites like Amazon Handmade and Etsy prove that there’s still a demand for bespoke wooden pieces. Likewise, more local craft fairs have also emerged in recent years, offering woodworkers an avenue to exhibit and sell their works.

 

“Carved from salvaged barn wood as a gift for my friend whose pug recently passed.”

 

“Scrollsawn project with all-natural woods (no stains or dyes). Prince John and Hiss from Robin Hood. Oodalally!!”

 

“Definitely the biggest project I’ve ever done. Solid oak through and through, all locally sourced in the Scottish Highlands.”

 

“I made a squirrel bar.”

 

“I carved and gifted the ‘Terminator pipe’ to Arnold birthday and he sent me a photo.”

 

“Chessboard with a twist I made for my sister and her family.”

 

9′ Hollow Wooden Longboard

 

“I keep seeing all your quarantine projects, so I thought I might share mine here too.”

 

“Heard there was a plywood challenge so here is my plywood rocker for consideration.”

 

“‘Splitting From The Norm’. A 16-year old from a local school has made an insanely awesome piece.”

 

“My 14-year-old daughter made this in shop class and I couldn’t be more proud!”

 

These drawers are so unique

 

While it’s easy to assume that woodworking is a dying art, it’s clearly not

 

“Vlad the builder: third project. We went for the classic picture frame to work on the 45s on the miter box. He got to help me set up the router table, but dad had to lend a hand on that cut. He also tried out the brad nailer and glue. (March 2018)”

 

“Melting wood effect I’m working on. Still needs some sandpaper love but very pleased with my first attempt.”

 

“Maiden Voyage of my first cedar strip canoe! No kit, no plans, no staples.”

 

“Made this to replace the stupid Lazy Susan cabinet. Yay or Nay?”

 

“I just turned 20 and have been doing woodwork for about a year now. Just finished this cherry desk with blackened legs.”

 

“After 8 months of hard work I can finally call it done! Over 1600 hrs of work into one staircase.”

So, instead of considering woodworking as a dying art, Curry sees it as an art form that constantly evolves based on customers’ demands.

 

“Ultimately, I have to remind myself that if the profit margins for the barn wood signs is similar to the dining room table, I have to make the signs if that’s what is more likely to sell. That’s not to say no one is willing to buy a nice table, but the customers’ wants and desires have shifted, so I have to do the same. This happens in every business or hobby that has been around for a while.”

What can you say about these people’s exceptional woodworking skills? Let us know which piece is your favorite in the comments section below!