Steve Irwin’s Daughter Bindi Is Keeping His Legacy Alive

 

When Australian Steve Irwin, a.k.a "The Crocodile Hunter," was killed by a sting ray while filming one of his legendary shows eight years ago, the world mourned the loss of someone so dedicated to animal rights. So, it is with great pride that Bindi Irwin, Steve's daughter, is continuing in her famous dad's footsteps, leading the way when it comes to animal conservation. You probably remember Bindi as a cute, pigtailed girl who appeared on her parents' tv shows. She even once presented her own wildlife documentary for kids, called "Bindi in the Jungle". But now, that little girl has grown into a beautiful and eloquent 16 year old, in her last year of school. After she graduates, she plans to work full time at her father's Australian Zoo. Read on for more about Bindi…

Website: instagram

 

Bindi Sue Irwin has more than 220,000 followers on Instagram. 

 

She spent her childhood living at the Australia Zoo, which her parents Steve and Teri, ran.

 

She was named Bindi after her father's favorite female croc at the zoo.

 

Sue came from "Sui" the family dog.

 

Bindi has blossomed into a beautiful and confident young woman.

 

"I have spent my entire life living in a zoo, which is pretty crazy. Not many kids get to say that," she told E!News.

 

"It took me until I was about three years old to realize that we didn't just come to the zoo every day, that we actually lived here."

 

"Every day we'd wake up and come to the zoo and I'd think 'we're coming to the zoo again. This is great!'"

 

Bindi says every day at the zoo is a new experience and so much fun.

 

The pretty teen began appearing on tv shows aged just two.

 

 

She inherited her natural ability in front of a camera from her parents.

 

Steve Irwin, Bindi's legendary dad, was tragically killed by a sting ray whilst filming in 2006.

 

Bindi says the best advice he gave her was to treat animals the way you would want to be treated. 

 

Bindi says her dad loved all animals, from crocs and cheetahs, to venomous snakes.

 

"It was never trying to overpower them or anything like that," she says of her dad's work.

 

"He was just loving them."

 

"And he was teaching other people about how beautiful they are."

 

Bindi says as well as teaching people to love animals, her dad also emphasized how much respect they needed to be treated with.

 

Steve Irwin's legacy will live on via Bindi, as she prepares to take up a full time position at Australia Zoo.

source: 1